Volume 7, Issue 3, October 2003   
     
Message from the Coordinator
Advocating for the Integration of Cancer Genetics Into Health Care


Agnes Masny, RN, MPH, MSN, CRNP
Philadelphia, PA
ac_masny@fccc.edu


With the approach of fall, we are gearing up for the ONS 4th Annual Institutes of Learning in Philadelphia. Kathy Calzone, RN, MSN, and I are presenting on the “Impact of the Human Genome Project for Oncology Nursing.” It is a major goal of the SIG to get the message out to the entire membership on how genetics will become more integrated into clinical practice. ONS continues to have a very good response to the Genetics Short Course and our SIG membership has grown to 113. This alone is testament to nurses seeing the application of genetics to their practice.

I had a first-hand opportunity to see how genetics is having an impact on all health care. This past June, I attended the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society (SACGHS). SACGHS was established in December 2002 to: (a) provide a forum for expert discussion and the formulation of advice on the range of complex issues raised by technological developments in human genetics; (b) assist the Department of Health and Human Services in exploring issues raised by the application of genetic technologies; and (c) make recommendations to the Secretary of Health and Human Services concerning how such issues should be addressed. The first meeting established priority areas from a broad scope of genetic issues. Input from committee members, other federal agencies, genetic experts, and the public helped to establish a thematic of issues to be tackled. First among the issues addressed was the need to move ahead federal legislation to prohibit discrimination in health insurance and employment on the basis of genetic information. A letter from the committee was drafted and sent to Secretary of Health and Human Services, Tommy Thompson. The letter thanked Secretary Thompson for his support that helped to move proposed legislation out of a Senate Committee. When this legislation is ready for a vote, ONS will notify the membership either through the SIG or a legislative alert.

 
 

Special Interest Group Newsletter  October 2003
 
   

Message from the Coordinator
Advocating for the Integration of Cancer Genetics Into Health Care


Agnes Masny, RN, MPH, MSN, CRNP
Philadelphia, PA
ac_masny@fccc.edu


With the approach of fall, we are gearing up for the ONS 4th Annual Institutes of Learning in Philadelphia. Kathy Calzone, RN, MSN, and I are presenting on the “Impact of the Human Genome Project for Oncology Nursing.” It is a major goal of the SIG to get the message out to the entire membership on how genetics will become more integrated into clinical practice. ONS continues to have a very good response to the Genetics Short Course and our SIG membership has grown to 113. This alone is testament to nurses seeing the application of genetics to their practice.

I had a first-hand opportunity to see how genetics is having an impact on all health care. This past June, I attended the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society (SACGHS). SACGHS was established in December 2002 to: (a) provide a forum for expert discussion and the formulation of advice on the range of complex issues raised by technological developments in human genetics; (b) assist the Department of Health and Human Services in exploring issues raised by the application of genetic technologies; and (c) make recommendations to the Secretary of Health and Human Services concerning how such issues should be addressed. The first meeting established priority areas from a broad scope of genetic issues. Input from committee members, other federal agencies, genetic experts, and the public helped to establish a thematic of issues to be tackled. First among the issues addressed was the need to move ahead federal legislation to prohibit discrimination in health insurance and employment on the basis of genetic information. A letter from the committee was drafted and sent to Secretary of Health and Human Services, Tommy Thompson. The letter thanked Secretary Thompson for his support that helped to move proposed legislation out of a Senate Committee. When this legislation is ready for a vote, ONS will notify the membership either through the SIG or a legislative alert.

SACGHS spent several hours reviewing the oversight of genetic tests, laboratories, and direct-to-consumer marketing. Concerns were raised about the need for an adequate, diverse healthcare workforce, as well as longer-range goals of integrating genetics into all of health care while providing access to genetic services to all populations. The next meeting, October 2003, will follow up with in-depth exploration of the above issues. Ex-officio committee members, those members representing federal agencies, such as the Human Genome Research Institute, the CDC, and the FDA, will present summary reports regarding the laboratory oversight and workforce preparation for the genomic era. I found that my presence on the committee was needed to inform and strengthen the position of nursing and genetics. Additionally, as a nurse, I could bring the perspective of the patient to the committee. Learning about the numerous ways that genetics is already used in practice and the potential for even more uses, it will be important for all nurses to remain visible in hospital, community, and national forums to promote the protection of patients while advocating for the integration of genetics into health care.

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  October 2003
 
   


Message from the Editor
Members Should Work Together to Make Newsletter a Valuable Resource


Marilyn Kile, RN, MSN, APRN, AOCN®
Kearney, NE
marilynkile@catholichealth.net


The 2003 SIG Leadership Orientation Workshop and ONS Congress in Denver this past May was a great springboard for assuming the position of newsletter editor for the ONS Cancer Genetics SIG. I look forward to the challenge and welcome your input regarding the newsletter. Please welcome our SIG co-editors, Pat Herman, RN, MSN, AOCN®, and Patricia Kelly, RN, MS, AOCN®. Their enthusiasm and assistance has been tremendous.

While at ONS Congress this year, there were two common questions heard by those attending the Cancer Genetics SIG meeting, cancer genetic sessions, and roundtable discussion. First, where can healthcare providers in general practice obtain education on cancer genetics? Second, how do we assure that those providing patient education on cancer genetics meet the standard for care?

We will strive in this newsletter to keep you informed of upcoming educational opportunities, new publications, resources, and legislative news. The newsletter will feature a new section this year, “The Practice Corner.” A genetics case study will be presented, and readers will have the opportunity to respond. Your responses may be sent via e-mail to the editor. We will publish responses in the next newsletter, or if there are many responses, we will select those that best illustrate a common theme.
Every editorial staff makes the same request, and we are no different. We are in need of writers. Please volunteer your time and expertise to write an article for the newsletter. Help keep our members informed of educational opportunities and new resources, review a research article and critique it, or notify us of new advances in cancer genetics. If you have a new publication that you want to bring to our members’ attention, send the information via e-mail. Help make this newsletter a great resource for our membership.

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  October 2003
 
   


SIG Meeting Minutes from Congress Networking Meeting


Submitted by: Judith Much, RN, APN-C, AOCN®

Date: Thursday, May 1, 2003

Place: Colorado Convention Center, Denver, CO


I. Introductions

  1. Agnes introduced all of the officers present.
  2. Members introduced themselves.
II. Historian needed
  1. Agnes announced the need for a new historian for the SIG, as Mary Fraser, RN, MA, is unable to continue.
  2. Deborah MacDonald, RN, MS, APNG, volunteered to be historian for the SIG
III. Business
  1. Minutes of the last SIG networking meeting were approved as published in the CAG SIG newsletter. The motion was seconded.
  2. Mission statement and goals for the SIG were reviewed.
    1. Goal number one is to achieve quality in cancer genetic care.
    2. Agnes suggested as a way to help achieve that goal that at the next ONS Congress, we have an expert present at an evening meeting. For example, this year at Congress, the NP SIG sponsored an evening meeting with an expert on NP billing. Funding suggestions included Myriad Genetics, Astra Zeneca, etc. Clair Alexander from Genomic Health felt that she might be able to supply a speaker re: new genomic technology.
    3. A number of educational opportunities were discussed as a method of maintaining quality.
      1. ONS Genetics Short Course
      2. NCI- funded courses
        1. City of Hope
        2. FCCC
      3. Myriad course
  3. ISONG credentialing is another way to ensure quality.
  4. NSGC is interested in doing some joint projects.
    1. A vote was taken, and the membership agreed that this avenue should be pursued.
    2. Some members described feeling there was "competition" between genetic counselors and nurses practicing cancer genetic counseling.
    3. As we work more with NSGC (many of us are already members), both groups will have a better appreciation of the unique aspects of each group's skill set and will see this as being complementary as opposed to competitive.
  5. Goal number two is to ensure the nurses role in cancer genetic care.
    1. ONS position statements have been updated.
    2. IOL was provided last year and is scheduled for this year.
    3. Cancer nurses will need to know about
      1. Microarray technology (tumor profiles) that may provide important prognostic indicators showing who will and will not need chemo.
      2. Risk profiles will be important in other arenas, as there will be other genes that put more of the population at risk (example "metabolism genes," which would influence how individuals metabolize drugs). These genes would have more importance in sporadic disease.
    4. Topic submission for 2004 Congress "A Test for All Seasons"
      1. Highlight basics of genetics and go into the newer applications of the technology.
      2. Will involve the Ethics SIG, which will help look into ELSI issues of the new technology
    5. Judie Much, RN, APN-C, AOCN®, discussed a proposed SIG project that would query the ONS membership to determine type of institution, who provides genetic information in the institution, and what educational preparation they have had.
    6. Volunteers to work with Judie included Karen Roesser, RN, MS, AOCN®, Rebecca Donohue, MSN, RN, CS, FNP, AOCN®, Amy Strauss Tranin, RN, ARNP, MS, AOCNŽ, and Agnes Masny, RN, MPH, MSN, CRNP
    7. Marty Weinar, RN, MS, CCRC, is working on a Genetics Bib for ONS CPON® and asked for volunteers to share references.
  6. Goal number three is to enhance CAG SIG and ONS viability.
    1. Agnes asked if the group would like to have conference calls on evidence-based cancer genetics. The group agreed.
    2. Use virtual community to the fullest.
      1. Use for e-mails?
      2. Should we survey the membership of the SIG to see if they are interested in sharing e-mail addresses?
      3. Cille Parker, RN, (lilstoneycreek@hotmail.com) with a degree in writing and editing, has worked with Listserves and search engines.
    3. Liason with ISONG and NSGC
      1. What kind of projects can we do with NSGC?
      2. What kind of projects can we do with ISONG?

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  October 2003
 
   


News from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

Jean Jenkins, PhD, RN, FAAN
Bethesda, MD
jean.Jenkins@nih.gov


NHGRI Funding Opportunities E-Mail List
The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) has a listserv to announce funding opportunities. Subscribers receive a brief summary of program announcements and requests for applications, with links to more detailed information. The list also is used to notify subscribers about new policies specific to NHGRI grantees and courses that receive support from NHGRI. Visit the NIH listserv to subscribe to and/or view archived bulletins.

This mailing list does not include announcements about the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Research Program. The ELSI Research Program maintains a separate e-mail list. To join that list, please contact ELSI@nhgri.nih.gov.

Funding Opportunities: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Research Program Announcements
NHGRI, along with several other National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes, previously released three general program announcements to solicit research and education projects that anticipate, analyze, and address the ethical, legal, and social implications of the discovery of new genetic technologies and the availability and use of genetic information resulting from human genetics and genomic research. For more details, see the project page on the NHGRI Web site.

Currently under development are new program announcements building on the vision for the future of genomics.

Researchers Discover Use of Novel Mechanism That Preserves Y Chromosome Genes
A detailed analysis of the just-completed sequence of the human Y chromosome—the chromosome that distinguishes males from females—has uncovered a novel mechanism by which it maintains its genetic integrity.

Genome Researchers Analyze Chromosome 7
In a study published in the July 10, 2003, issue of the journal Nature, a multi-institution team, led by the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, reported it had sequenced 99.4% of the gene-containing region of chromosome 7 to an accuracy of greater than 99.99%. A detailed analysis of the reference sequence of chromosome 7 has uncovered structural features that appear to promote genetic changes that can cause disease.

NHGRI Study May Help Scientists Design Safer Methods for Gene Therapy
Researchers at NHGRI may have taken a major step toward safer gene therapy for patients. The discovery that the genetically engineered mouse virus used in gene therapy trials shows that it tends to insert itself at the beginning of genes in the target cell, potentially disrupting the genes’ normal function.

New Internet Exhibit
Check out a new Internet exhibit produced by the Stetten Museum and several of the Institutes at NIH: A Revolution in Progress: Human Genetics and Medical Research.

Institute of Medicine (IOM)
On July 29, 2003, a report from IOM, “Enhancing the Vitality of the National Institutes of Health (NIH): Organizational Change to Meet New Challenges” recommended a restructuring of NIH. One recommendation under consideration is that NHGRI and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) merge. See the National Academies Press Web site for more details. Congressional hearings will occur September 2003 regarding the IOM recommendations (legislation would be required to enact any NIH organizational restructuring).

Genomic Medicine Series
The last article of the series published in the New England Journal of Medicine and an accompanying editorial will be published in the September 4, 2003, issue. If you have not had a chance to read the articles, the references are listed below:

References
Burke, W. (2002). Genomic medicine: Genetic testing. New England Journal of Medicine, 347, 1867–1875.

Burke, W. (2003). Genomic medicine: Genomics as a probe for disease biology. New England Journal of Medicine, 349, 969-974.

Guttmacher, A.E., & Collins, F.S. (2002). Genomic medicine: A primer. New England Journal of Medicine, 347, 1512–1520.

Guttmacher, A.E., & Collins, F.S. (2003). Genomic medicine: Welcome to the genomic era. New England Journal of Medicine, 349, 996-998.

Khoury, M., McCabe, L., & McCabe, E.R.B. (2003). Genomic medicine: Population screening in the age of genomic medicine. New England Journal of Medicine, 348, 50–58.

Lynch, H., & de la Chapelle, A. (2003). Genomic medicine: Hereditary colorectal cancer. New England Journal of Medicine, 348, 919–932.

Nabel, E.G. (2003). Genomic medicine: Cardiovascular disorders. New England Journal of Medicine, 349, 60–72.

Nussbaum, R.L., & Ellis, C.E. (2003). Genomic medicine: Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. New England Journal of Medicine, 348, 1356–1364.

Staudt, L.M. (2003). Genomic medicine: Molecular diagnosis of the hematologic cancers. New England Journal of Medicine, 348, 1777–1785.

Weinshilboum, R. (2003). Genomic medicine: Inheritance and drug response. New England Journal of Medicine, 348, 529–537.

Wooster, R., & Weber, B.L. (2003). Genomic medicine: Breast and ovarian cancer. New England Journal of Medicine, 348, 2339–2347.

Wright, C.E. (2003). Genomic medicine: Ethical, legal and social implications of genomic medicine. New England Journal of Medicine, 349, 562–569.



 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  October 2003
 
   


American Society of Clinical Oncology Releases New Policy Statement on Genetic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility

Marilyn Kile, RN, MSN, APRN, AOCN®
Kearney, NE
marilynkile@catholichealth.net


The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) adopted an updated policy statement on genetic testing for cancer susceptibility in March and published the statement on June 15, 2003, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. First published in 1996, ASCO sought to provide clinicians with recommendations for educating, counseling, and testing individuals at high risk for hereditary cancer syndromes; to provide recommendations on regulation of laboratories providing genetic testing; and to provide endorsements for legislation governing discrimination and insurance issues. ASCO has made significant changes in several areas. A comprehensive discussion will not be included in this review; however, a couple of the most noteworthy changes will be identified.

The first significant recommendation in the new policy statement deals with the use of probability models and the designation of a numerical threshold for determining if a person is eligible for genetic testing. Probability models for determining if someone may carry a mutation are used to aid clinicians in determining if a patient should have genetic testing (Tranin, Masny, & Jenkins, 2003). This is one piece of information a clinician may use; however, it does not represent the total picture. Previously, a numerical threshold of greater than 10% prior probability for carrying a mutation was established as the value to use when considering whether an individual should undergo genetic testing (ASCO, 1996). In the updated policy statement, it is acknowledged that there are limitations to these probability models and that “. . . it is neither feasible nor practical to set numerical thresholds” to determine if someone should have genetic testing (ASCO, 2003). Rather, greater emphasis has been placed on the clinicians’ interpretation of an individual’s personal and family history.

One other significant addition to the new policy statement is the recommendations related to genetic testing of children. In 1996, this issue was not addressed in the policy statement. ASCO now hopes to establish some guidelines to assist clinicians in decision making when working with children.

Overall, ASCO has provided a more in-depth discussion of many of the current issues that face clinicians in working with people at hereditary risk for cancer. To view the policy statement online, visit the ASCO Web site.

References
American Society of Clinical Oncology. (1996). Statement of the American Society of Clinical Oncology: Genetic testing for cancer susceptibility. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 14, 1730–1736.

American Society of Clinical Oncology. (2003). Statement of the American Society of Clinical Oncology: Genetic testing for cancer susceptibility. Retrieved August 2003, from http://www.asco.org

Tranin, A.S., Masny, A., & Jenkins, J. (2003). Genetics in oncology practice: Cancer risk assessment. Pittsburgh, PA: Oncology Nursing Society.



 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  October 2003
 
   


Sporadic Versus Hereditary Colon Cancer: What is the Role of Microsatellite Instability Testing?

Pat Kelly, RN, MS, AOCN®
Dallas, TX
PatriciaKelly@TexasHealth.org


The American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG), a coordinating center for multi-institutional collaborative clinical trials, is conducting study Z0190, “A Prospective Study of the Prognostic Significance of Microsatellite Instability in Patients With Early Age-of-Onset Colorectal Cancer.” The primary objective of Z0190 is to evaluate whether microsatellite instability (MSI) plays a role in overall survival of patients and the possible interaction of MSI status and family history.

Patients with stage I, II, or III adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum between the ages of 18 and 49 at initial diagnosis may be eligible to participate. Patients also must have a complete baseline colonoscopy prior to or within three months of the initial curative colorectal resection. Tissue samples from the resection will be assessed for MSI status, and a detailed family history assessment will be performed. Patients will undergo surveillance colonoscopies at one-, three-, and five-year intervals after the initial resection. Patients do not receive the results of the MSI testing, but an assessment of the risk of familial or hereditary cancer is provided. Patients may elect to have additional MSI testing completed outside of the study.
Cancer Genetics SIG nurses may want to notify their patients about this important prospective research study. MSI manifests itself as short nucleotide repeats and is frequently seen in patients who have defects in mismatch repair genes. These defects may be a part of Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC). Although this study does not provide MSI testing results, participation heightens awareness about early-onset colon cancer and the value of MSI testing, family history, and surveillance colonoscopies.

For more information about participating in Z0190 or for a list of study sites, contact Jean Pesarchick-Wood, study coordinator for Z0190, at 919-668-8206 or via e-mail at persar002@surgerytrials.duke.edu.

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  October 2003
 
   


Practice Corner


A woman, in her 20s, presents for education and counseling for genetic testing at the advice of her medical oncologist. She has had surgery for an abdominal carcinomatosis. The operative report states that there is involvement of the colon and the ovaries but because it is very poorly differentiated, it is uncertain if it is a colon primary with extension to the ovaries or an ovarian primary with extension to the colon. Chemotherapy recommendations will depend on whether it is an ovarian or colon primary. The consulting oncologist has asked to have BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing, as well as HNPCC testing to see if there is a genetic mutation. The client is adopted and has no way of obtaining biologic family information. She is a high school graduate with some college courses, has had several jobs since high school, and has spent some time in third-world countries. There is no known hazardous material exposure.

The following is a list of questions for your consideration.

Is this an appropriate referral?
Are there any ethical considerations?
How would you counsel and educate her?

Please submit your questions, comments and expert opinion to the newsletter editor. Feedback on this case study will be printed in the next newsletter.


 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  October 2003
 
   


Conference Announcements and New Publications


Register today for ONS 4th Annual Institutes of Learning—A Learning Experience to Meet Your Needs
Are you looking for an in-depth learning opportunity that covers the latest in oncology nursing and cancer information? If so, join your colleagues at the ONS 4th Annual Institutes of Learning, November 7–9, in Philadelphia, PA.

This comprehensive educational event, designed specifically for oncology nurses like you, is a one-of-a-kind learning experience tailored to meet your educational needs.
This year’s conference offers three six-hour “institutes” and ten three-hour “mini institutes” focusing on topics and treatments that affect you and your patients in today’s healthcare arena. By attending, you can earn up to 13.6 contact hours of continuing education.

The best part of this learning experience is the flexibility it offers you. All institutes are open to all attendees—You select the offerings and topic areas that interest you most!

What Will Be Your Role in the Genetics Revolution?
(This article originally appeared in the August 2003 issue of the ONS News, 18(8), 11.)

Do you understand how cancer and genetics are related? Can you provide accurate information for your patients regarding genetic risk for cancer or the use of gene therapy as a cancer treatment? Do you want to include a genetic question, focus, or outcome in your research and education efforts?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, ONS invites you to register for the Genetics Short Course for Cancer Nurses. This unique program is designed to increase your knowledge base of this cutting-edge field. ONS is accepting applications from oncology nurses who have completed an advanced master’s and/or doctoral nursing degree who feel that the genetics revolution is happening without them.

Courses will be held November 9–11, in Philadelphia, PA; March 26–28, 2004, in Pittsburgh, PA; and May 1–3, 2004, in Anaheim, CA.

The course is supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute to limit participants’ out-of-pocket expenses. The program does not have tuition or a registration fee, and travel and per diem expenses are significantly subsidized for participants.

For additional information and to download an application, visit the Genetics Short Course for Cancer Nurses Web site or contact ONS Education Cancer Care Issues Team at 412-859-6207 or eccit@ons.org.

The International Society of Nurses in Genetics (ISONG) 16th Annual International Conference
“Riding the New Wave of Genetic Nursing” is the theme for this year’s ISONG conference, to be held on November 2–4 at the Omni Los Angeles Hotel at the California Plaza in Los Angeles. A preconference workshop is scheduled on November 1 from 12–5 pm. For complete information about the conference and registration, visit their Web site at http://www.isong.org.

Member Publications
Masny, A., Daly, M., Ross, E., Balshem, A., Gillespie, D., & Weil, S. (2003). A training course for oncology nurses in familial cancer risk assessment: Evaluation of knowledge and practice. Journal of Cancer Education, 18, 20–25.

Lea, D., & Masny, A. (2003). Genetics perspectives in nursing. In S.C. O’Connell-Smeltzer & B.G. Bare (Eds.), Brunner & Suddarth’s textbook of medical-surgical nursing (10th ed., pp. 123-145). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  October 2003
 
   


Welcome New Members


Gabriele Chandler, RN, Houston, TX
Theresa Kremer, RN, BSN, Lincoln, NE
Debra Mercy, CRNP, Boise, ID
Stephen Achuff, RNC, OCN®, MN, ARNP, Milton, WA
Gary Bayne, RN, MSN, CS, AOCN®, Johnson City, TN
Bew Meng Lai, Philadelphia, PA
Virginia Pichler, RN, PhD, Rockville, MD
Laura Beamer, MS, RN, CS, Chicago, IL
Agnes Wong, RN, OCN®, San Francisco, CA
Phyllis Peterson, RN, MN, AOCN®, New Orleans, LA
Marilyn O’Donnell, RN, BSN, OCN®, Des Moines, IA
Cheryl Hopkins, RN, OCN®, Yakima, WA
Kathleen Verne, RN, Cincinnati, OH
Faith Mutale, APN, Philadelphia, PA
Janet Goeldner, RN, MSN, AOCN®, Cleves, OH
Jill Conrad, RN, Peoria, IL
Ellen Reifschneider, RN, PhD, Green Bay, WI
Mary Chretien, RN, Leesburg, VA
Leah Arsenault, RN, West Kingston, RI
Marla Morris, RN, OCN®, BSN, Tulsa, OK
Mary Jusenius, RN, BSN, OCN®, Seattle, WA
Elaine Sein, RN, BSN, OCN®, Southhampton, PA
Gail Hurt, RN, MAED, Yadkinville, NC
Sharon Nall, RN, BSN, CNS, OCN®, Oklahoma City, OK
Willa Anderson, Glasgow, KY
Melanie Cordoro, RN, BSN, Falls Church, VA
Sophia Clem, RN, OCN®, Gainesville, FL
Martha Healey, FNP, Boston, MA
Mary DiDonato, RN, Akron, OH
Susan Zuk, RN, MS, AOCN®, Lincoln University, PA
Sandra Lauria, RN, Cheshire, CT
Sharlae Berte, Menomonee Falls, WI
Dina Hess, RN, Bartimore, MD
Nancy Hamilton, RN, MA, Shadyside, OH
Robin Stevens, RN, Jupiter, FL
Karen Morris, RN, BSN, Aurora, CO
Carole Spinelli, RN, MA, New York, NY
Karen Wamstad, San Francisco, CA
Patricia Weigand, RN, MSN, AOCN®, Pittsburgh, PA
Elizabeth Watts, RN, Tucson, AZ
Lois Fisher, RN, MSN, AOCN®, Grand Junction, CO
Arlene Burns, RN, OCN®, Sarasota, FL
Joan Wendel, RN, BSN, MSN, AOCN®, Chagrin Falls, FL
Joanne Benrud, RN, BSN, Chicago, IL

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  October 2003
 
   


Cancer Genetics SIG Officers

Coordinator
Agnes Masny, RN, MPH, MSN, CRNP
Fox Chase Cancer Center
7701 Burholme Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19111-2412
215-728-2892 (O)
215-728-4061 (fax)
ac_masny@fccc.edu

Coordinator-Elect
Judith Much, RN, APN-C, AOCN®
9027 Easton Rd.
Ottsville, PA 18942-9653
732-235-6925 (O)
732-235-7715 (fax)
muchjk@umdnj.edu

Historian

Deborah MacDonald RN, MS, CS, APNG(c)
City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center
1500 Duarte Rd.
Duarte CA 91010-3012
626-256-6882 (O)
dmacdonald@coh.org

 

Newsletter Editor
Marilyn Kile, RN, MSN, APRN, AOCN®
Good Samaritan Health Systems Cancer Center
10 East 31st
Kearney, NE 68848-1990
308-865-7199 (O)
308-865-2907 (fax)
marilynkile@catholichealth.net

Newsletter Co-Editors
Patricia Kelly, RN, MS, AOCN®
Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas
8198 Walnut Hill Lane
Dallas, TX 75231
214-345-8324 (O)
214-345-6349 (fax)
PatriciaKelly@TexasHealth.org

Patricia B. Herman, MSN, RN, AOCN®
St. Luke’s Hospital and Health Network
801 Ostrum St.
Bethlehem, PA 18015
610-954-3579 (O)
610-954-3583 (fax)
hermanp@slhn.org

 

ONS Publishing Division Staff
Lori Wilson, BA
Staff Editor
Business: 412-859-6288
lwilson@ons.org

 

Know someone who would like to receive a print copy of this newsletter?
To print a copy of this newsletter from your home or office computer, click here or on the printer icon located on the SIG Newsletter front page. Print copies of each online SIG newsletter also are available through the ONS National Office. To have a copy mailed to you or another SIG member, contact Membership/Leadership Administrative Assistant Carol DeMarco at carol@ons.org or 866-257-4ONS, ext. 6230.

ONS Membership/Leadership Team Contact Information
Angie Stengel, Director of Membership/Leadership
astengel@ons.org
412-859-6244

Diedrea White, Manager of Member Relations
dwhite@ons.org
412-859-6256

Carol DeMarco, Membership/Leadership Administrative Assistant
carol@ons.org
412-859-6230

The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) does not assume responsibility for the opinions expressed and information provided by authors or by Special Interest Groups (SIGs). Acceptance of advertising or corporate support does not indicate or imply endorsement of the company or its products by ONS or the SIG. Web sites listed in the SIG newsletters are provided for information only. Hosts are responsible for their own content and availability.

Oncology Nursing Society
125 Enterprise Dr.
Pittsburgh, PA 15275-1214
866-257-4ONS
412-859-6100
ONS Online: www.ons.org

 
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