Nurse Navigator

special interest group newsletter

Volume 6, Issue 2, August 2015  
 
   
Coordinatorís Message:
Defining the Role of the
Nurse Navigator

Jean B. Sellers, RN, MSN
Chapel Hill, NC
jean_sellers@med.unc.edu

An ONS position statement released in June addressed the role and qualifications of oncology nurse navigators (ONNs). At the heart of this position statement was the belief that all ONNs should be oncology certified to address critical aspects of cancer care. Although this is a minimum requirement, it is a first step in supporting, strengthening, and advancing our role.

The literature and, more importantly, our patients continue to iterate the need for patient navigation. Uninsured or underinsured patients do not have the same access to care as patients with adequate insurance. This population experiences poorer outcomes and a 10%-15% worse mortality rate (Freeman & Rodrigues, 2011). The Commission on Cancer mandates that accredited cancer centers have navigation processes, but patients, survivors, and caregivers living in counties without cancer centers have informational, psychosocial, and supportive care needs that also must be met (Commission on Cancer, 2012).

Kevin Sowers, RN, MSN, delivered a powerful keynote address at Congress in April. His takeaway message was that as nurses, we can no longer be content to care for patients as we have in the past. We must challenge our models of care to meet the growing needs of patients with cancer and survivors. When professional and nonprofessional healthcare workers collaborate, patients will experience better outcomes. ONNs are in a position to help bridge gaps and ensure that quality care is provided throughout the continuum.

Our voices must be unified and strong. ONS will help us articulate, define, and promote the role of ONNs. The struggles we face today confirm that our work is not done. Be proactive and help us explore new ways we can work together to ensure that our patients receive the quality of care and timely treatment they deserve.

References
Commission on Cancer. (2012). Cancer program standards 2012: Ensuring patient-centered care [v.1.2.1]. Chicago, IL: American College of Surgeons. Retrieved from https://www.facs.org/~/media/files/quality%20programs/cancer/coc/
programstandards2012.ashx

Freeman, H.P., & Rodrigues, R.L. (2011). History and principles of patient navigation. Cancer, 117, 3539-3542. doi:10.1002/cncr.26262

 
The Nurse Navigator SIG Newsletter is produced by members of the
Nurse Navigator SIG and ONS staff and is not a peer-reviewed publication.

Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Editorís Corner:
The Importance of Recognition

Deborah Christensen, RN, BSN, OCN®, HNB-BC
St. George, UT
deborah.christensen@imail.org

During our cancer center staff meetings at the Southwest Cancer Center is St. George, UT, colleagues are given a designated time to recognize one another. This activity starts out slowly, but it soon snowballs into a backslapping, high-five-ing party of praise with everyone (the recognizing and the recognized) enjoying the camaraderie.

During the Nurse Navigator (NAV) Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting at Congress, attendees had the opportunity to submit shout-outs for the newsletter. Those submissions are included in this issue in what will hopefully be the beginning of a new feature. Recognize yourself, a friend, or an organization by sending me a quick email. It only takes a few keystrokes to make someone smile.

Another recurring newsletter feature is our review section, which covers books, services, and resources. In this issue, Kathy Seymour, BSN, RN, OCN®, writes about Schwartz Center Rounds®. Also in this issue, Gean Brown, MSN, RN, OCN®, delivers a recap on the Congress presentation, “Cancer Navigation Across the Cancer Continuum.” Finally, Cyndi Miller Murphy, RN, MSN, CAE, explains the differences between a certification, a certificate program, and a certificate of completion. You also won’t want to miss the newly approved navigation toolkit, a work of love completed by members of the NAV SIG Leadership team.

Writing is a way of sharing thoughts, questions, passions, frustrations, ups, downs, and most of all, what we find compelling. The contributors to this issue of the NAV SIG Newsletter are sharing with you, readers and fellow colleagues, something they find meaningful. I trust you will, too.

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Member Spotlight:
Leadership in Navigation With Lynn Cole

Deborah Christensen, RN, BSN, OCN®, HNB-BC
St. George, UT
deborah.christensen@imail.org

When asked what sparked her interest in joining the Nurse Navigator Special Interest Group (SIG), Lynn Cole, RN, BSN, OCN®, a thoracic nurse navigator at the Gibbs Cancer Center and Research Institute in Spartanburg, SC, didn’t hesitate to say that networking with other navigators was a key factor. “The beauty of SIGs is being able to reach out to others for assistance and guidance in growing my program,” she said. Lynn values navigators’ ability to help patients with their individual needs. She began her nursing career in 1988 and, within three years, transitioned to oncology where she has been ever since. She has been working as a nurse navigator for the past four.

Lynn loves to travel and says her dream job would be to work on the Greek islands. These are some of the mantras she lives by.

  • It is not the destination but the journey.
  • Live every day to its fullest.
  • Try not to sweat the small stuff; it’s all small stuff.

In 2015, the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation chose Lynn as its Certified Nurse of the Year. Not only did Lynn increase the number of certified nurses in her inpatient oncology unit, she also developed a low-dose lung cancer screening clinic and hosted a caregiver event called Shine the Light on Cancer. Lynn exemplifies nurse navigation and is very deserving of this award. Congratulations, Lynn. Keep doing great things.

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Leadership and Membership Updates

Deborah Christensen, RN, BSN, OCN®, HNB-BC
St. George, UT
deborah.christensen@imail.org

Rebecca Crane-Okada, PhD, RN, CNS, AOCN®, joined the Nurse Navigator (NAV) Special Interest Group (SIG) Leadership team. Along with more than 35 years of oncology nursing experience, Rebecca brings a deep passion for integrating the emotional, spiritual, and social needs of patients with cancer into care. She is a great mentor and a wonderful addition to the leadership team.

Our NAV SIG group has grown by 31 new members since the beginning of 2015. Welcome!

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Nurse Navigator Shout-Outs

  • Lynn Cole, RN, BSN, OCN®, Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation’s 2015 Nurse of the Year
  • Rebecca Robertson, RN, BSN, OCN®, South Carolina Palmetto Gold Award recipient
  • Cheryl Bellomo’s, RN, BSN, OCN®, article “The Effect of Navigator Intervention on the Continuity of Care” was published in the Journal of Oncology Navigation and Survivorship.
  • Deborah Christensen’s, RN, BSN, OCN , HNB-BC, article “The Health Change Trajectory: An Integrated Model of Health Change” was published in Advances in Nursing Science.
  • Juli Aistars, RN, APN, AOCN®, TTS, and the rest of the Nurse Navigator Special Interest Group Leadership team created the “Tools and Resources for the New and Experienced Oncology Nurse Navigator,” a compilation of navigation resources.

Please send any letters of recognition to Deborah Christensen.

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Leadership Team Updates

Click to enlarge.

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Exploring Schwartz Center Rounds®

Kathy Seymour, BSN, RN, OCN®
Whittier, CA
kathy.seymour@pihhealth.org

I have been fortunate enough to have attended several oncology nurse navigation conferences and ONS Congresses, interacting with navigators throughout the country. Connecting and sharing our challenges and triumphs is wonderful. One of the challenges we face is self-care, specifically, avoiding distress and burnout. Coping with loss after navigating a patient through the lengthy journey of cancer treatment is difficult. Sometimes, we can’t provide the services or care a patient should have. All nurses face moral dilemmas while balancing the needs of patients, families, and staff members. Some of us are fortunate enough to work with a team of navigators with which we can debrief, share concerns, and support. Other navigators work independently and are isolated from other nurses. The intimacy and intensity of oncology nursing requires reflection and discussion to maintain momentum. After Congress, I better appreciated these challenges, and I set a new goal to care for myself while giving compassion to fellow navigators.

I recently discovered an opportunity for personal growth and reflection. I belong to the Orange County, CA, chapter of ONS, and at our last monthly meeting, Kathy Pearson, RN, MN, CNS, AOCN®, gave an inspirational presentation on Schwartz Center Rounds®. After her presentation, we participated in a mock round. Reflecting on the experiences of the nurses, I felt a surge of empathy for the members of my chapter and appreciated how vulnerable we all are.

The Schwartz Center is a “national nonprofit organization dedicated to nurturing patient-caregiver relationships to strengthen the human connection at the heart of healthcare” (Schwartz Center, n.d.). Ken Schwartz founded the center just days before he died of lung cancer at the age of 40. Through his journey, he realized that the emotional connection from patient to caregiver, and caregiver to caregiver, is of the utmost importance in the healing process (Schwartz Center, n.d.).

According to the Schwartz Center (n.d.), a third of nurses suffer from burnout, and many of those nurses are beginning to seek help. Nurses typically are not prepared for the difficult communication issues and moral distresses that are inevitable when caring for patients. In addition, there seldom is a structured outlet for expressing feelings. This is where Schwartz Center Rounds can help. These are not traditional medical rounds; their purpose is to provide a level playing field on which discussions about the human experience can be held. Caregivers share thought-provoking topics from actual patient cases.

Participants make better connections with patients and colleagues when they have greater insights into their own feelings, vulnerabilities, and responses. The program opens an opportunity for dialog that doesn't usually occur in today's healthcare setting. After engaging in Schwartz Center Rounds, 80% of participants reported feeling more compassionate toward colleagues, patients, and families (Schwartz Center, n.d.).

“Many hospitals across the country are participating in Schwartz Center Rounds. The Goodman Research Group evaluated rounds in 10 hospitals and report evidence of enthusiasm, better teamwork, increased insight into patients’ psychosocial needs, and organization-wide improvements such as enhanced palliative care services” (Raso, 2009, p. 1).

Although these rounds are not specifically for navigators, there have been many times when I would have benefited from a forum in which compassion and sharing was vital. I implore you to visit the Schwartz Center’s website. You will find inspiration and appreciation for your colleges.

References
Raso, R. (2009). Improving practice with Schwartz rounds; The DNP degree. Nursing Management, 40, 56. doi:10.1097/01.NUMA.0000359211.19155.63

Schwartz Center. (n.d.). The Schwartz Center at a glance. Retrieved from https://www.theschwartzcenter.org/about-us/schwartz-center-glance/

Additional Resource
Whitehead, P., & Malik, R. (2015). The impact of Schwartz Center Rounds on moral distress in a large healthcare system. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 40, 461. doi:10.1016/jpainsymman.2014.11.281

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Team of Navigators Presented at Congress

Gean Brown, MSN, RN, OCN®
Middletown, CT
gean.brown@midhosp.org

Lori Dagostino, BSN, RN, OCN®
Colorado Springs, CO
LoriDagostino@centura.org

Teresa Labovich, RN, MSN, OCN®
Colorado Springs, CO
teresalabovich@centura.org

The Nurse Navigator (NAV) Special Interest Group (SIG) was represented during multiple sessions of the ONS 40th Annual Congress. The session “Cancer Navigation Across the Cancer Continuum”brought three NAV SIG members together from two different states to present on their specialties.

Proactive Phone Intervention
Lori Dagostino, BSN, RN, OCN®, malignant hematology nurse navigator at the Penrose Cancer Center in Colorado Springs, CO, gave a lively presentation on the link between proactive telephone support and decreases in unplanned hospitalizations among patients with cancer. Weekly telephone support consisting of proactive symptom assessment was administered to patients at the Penrose Cancer Center at high risk for hospitalization, which decreased admissions and led to an estimated savings of $495,000 in annual healthcare costs, according to Dagostino’s presentation. The audience asked many questions about the possible implementation of similarly effective evidence-based programs. Lori pointed out that support was provided by an oncology certified nurse navigator as part of a multidisciplinary approach.

Best Practice in Gastrointestinal Oncology
Teresa Labovich, RN, MSN, OCN®, gastrointestinal (GI) oncology nurse navigator at the same Penrose Cancer Center, spoke on implementing best practices in GI oncology nurse navigation. By following the National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s guidelines and national benchmark data, her multidisciplinary team was able to improve patient outcomes and increase adherence to guidelines. Teresa delivered staff and provider education, tracked and monitored pathology results, and facilitated patient flow through multiple disciplines. Teresa pointed out that oncology nurse navigators are able to remove barriers and facilitate timely, comprehensive, evidence-based care that ultimately improves patient outcomes.

Role of Navigation in Lung Screening
Gean Brown, MSN, RN, OCN®, cancer center clinical manager and former lung navigator at the Middlesex Hospital Cancer Center in Middletown, CT, presented on the role of oncology nurses in lung cancer screening. She pointed out that access to screening programs may influence survival rates for patients with lung cancer. By working with a multidisciplinary team, oncology nurses are uniquely positioned to lead the way in implementing such programs and their related care pathways. The role of nurse navigators, including provider outreach, education, facilitation of screening programs, and coordination of follow-up, also was discussed. Oncology nurses help patients through transitions between screening, diagnosis, treatment, and beyond.

Colon Screening
The speakers were joined by Heather Askren, RN, NP-C, OCN®, a non-navigator who told the audience about an inflatable colon that was purchased to educate the public on the importance of colonoscopy. Heather explained that the inflatable colon was an attempt to work toward the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable’s “80% by 2018” objective of having 80% of adults aged 50 and older regularly screened for colorectal cancer by 2018. The presentation had some entertaining pictures, and the audience thoroughly enjoyed Heather’s presentation.

“Cancer Navigation Across the Cancer Continuum” was well attended. During the question and answer period, attendees asked great questions that led to a lively discussion on the role of nurse navigators.

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Is It a Certification, a Certificate Program,
or a Certificate of Completion? Be a Savvy
Consumer and Know the Difference.


Cyndi Miller Murphy, RN, MSN, CAE
Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation (ONCC) Executive Director
Reprinted from ONCC Certification News, Vol. 22, Issue 1, Spring 2008.

The term “certification” is used a lot these days and doesn’t always mean the same thing to everyone. Programs referred to as certifications by a variety of providers do not always represent the same level of achievement. For example, some providers label attendance at continuing education (CE) programs as “certification” and tell the participants that they may call themselves “certified” in a defined area of practice upon completion of the program. Those who have passed a comprehensive broad-based certification examination, such as the OCN® test, know that attendance at a weekend CE program does not represent the same level of achievement. Nurses, as consumers of these programs, need to understand what each type of program represents in order to make wise decisions about the programs in which they invest. Nurses often spend their own money to become certified or attend CE programs. Employers also invest in these programs. Both nurses and employers need to be able to assess programs so that they fully understand what they are consuming and do not misrepresent themselves or those they employ as “certified” when they are not.

The Institute for Credentialing Excellence (ICE), a membership association for certifying organizations with an accreditation arm for certification programs, has published a document that defines the features of quality certification and assessment-based certificate programs. ONCC subscribes to these definitions.

Certification
ICE defines professional certification as “the voluntary process by which a nongovernmental entity grants a time-limited recognition and use of a credential to an individual after verifying that he or she has met predetermined and standardized criteria” (ICE, 2010, p. 6). Certification is the process by which “individuals are evaluated against predetermined standards for knowledge, skills, and competencies” and granted a time-limited credential (ICE, 2010, p. 2). The primary purpose of certification is assessment (e.g., a multiple choice examination) that is independent of a specific course of study or educational provider. The assessment generally evaluates mastery of the knowledge and skills required to competently perform in a profession or occupation or to provide a specific service. Certification programs, because of their broad nature, are not tied to a specific course of study or an educational course, curriculum, or provider. Certification may be required for regulatory purposes or may have a significant impact on (or may be required for) hiring, promotion, and other employment-related outcomes. Examples of high-quality certification programs include all of the ONCC certifications and as many others that have received accreditation from the American Board of Nursing Specialties or the National Commission for Certifying Agencies.

Assessment-Based Certificate Program
An assessment-based certificate program is a relatively short, non-degree granting program that provides instruction and training to aid participants in acquiring knowledge, skills, and competencies and designates that participants have passed an end-of-program assessment (test) derived from the course objectives. Assessment-based certificate programs typically cover a relatively narrow set of knowledge, skills, and competencies associated with fulfillment of a role, completion of a process, support of a product, provision of a service, or fulfillment of CE requirements. Although assessment is an integral part of the certificate program, the primary purpose is to provide instruction and training. Certificate programs generally are not required for regulatory purposes and do not have a significant impact on hiring, promotion, and other key employment outcomes. An example of a high-quality certificate program is ONS’s.

Certificate of Attendance or Participation
A certificate of attendance is issued after an individual attends or participates in an educational program. The certificate indicates only that the individual attended the program. Usually, knowledge at the end of the program is not assessed, although participants may be required to complete an evaluation of the program to obtain a certificate of completion. These certificates most often are used to document that an individual has attained CE in a specific content area.

In nursing, one way to judge the quality of a CE program is to determine whether the program is accredited or approved by an accredited approver. Accrediting bodies have set standards and criteria for quality CE programs, and only the programs that meet those standards and criteria receive accreditation. Only accredited CE programs meet the criteria for recertification through ONCC’s Oncology Nursing Certification Points Renewal Option (ONC-PRO). Nurses should be savvy consumers and determine if a CE program is accredited before attending the program. All CE programs provided by ONS and APHON are accredited nursing CE programs. Examples of high-quality CE programs are the annual ONS Congress and the annual APHON conference.

In summary, nurses, employers, and others who may invest in certification, certificate programs, or CE should be wise consumers and understand the ramifications of the programs in which they invest. All three types of programs have an important role to play in the professional development of nurses. However, consumers should be sure that the providers of the programs are not misrepresenting the programs. Nurses also should be sure to represent themselves appropriately upon completion of a program.

Reference
Institute for Credentialing Excellence. (2010). Defining features of quality certification and assessment-based certificate programs. Washington, DC: Institute for Credentialing Excellence. Retrieved from http://www.credentialingexcellence.org/p/cm/ld/fid=4

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Online Article Review

Deborah Christensen, RN, BSN, OCN®, HNB-BC
St. George, UT
deborah.christensen@imail.org

In a room full of oncology nurse navigators, you will hear the question, “What metrics do you use to demonstrate your worth?” asked multiple times. Navigators want to show the value of their role in improving patient care and reducing healthcare costs. Care coordination and transitional management (CCTM) is a care model that parallels nurse navigation. Haws and Swan (2014) outlined the benefits of evaluating CCTM within a logic model. The authors did a superb job of qualifying the competencies needed for registered nurses to be recognized and reimbursed for CCTM services by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Read the entire article for more information.

Reference
Haws, S., & Swan, B.A. (2014). Developing the value proposition for the role of registered nurse in care coordination and transitional management in ambulatory care settings. Nursing Economics, 33, 70-79. Retrieved from http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/824579

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Nurse Navigator Toolkit

This year, the Nurse Navigator Special Interest Group Leadership completed the resource, “Tools and Resources for the New and Experienced Oncology Nurse Navigator.” The toolkit is a compilation of information from accredited sources geared toward helping nurses develop patient navigation programs, refine best practices, establish care models, and more. The project was headed up by Juli Aistars, RN, APN, AOCN®, TTS, after the need for a navigation resource was identified as a critical aspect in supporting nurse navigators earlier this year.
 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Influence Cancer Care Across the Country

You already make a difference for the patients you care for every day. Now, with Cancer and Health Policy: Advancements and Opportunities, you can make a difference for patients across the country by influencing health policies that will guide the future of cancer care in the United States.

Learn how to affect cancer and health policy with a thorough overview of the legislative process and advocacy information. Lead change at the national level, thanks to guidance from key experts in multiple disciplines.

Save 10% on your copy when you order using code PAHPA10 by midnight on July 31.

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation Is
Pilot-Testing Employer Discount Program


Many employers recognize the benefits of having certified nursing staff on their team, but not all realize the positive impact that employer support can have on individual nurses. Reimbursing nurses who pass a certification test is a much-appreciated first step, but savvy employers realize doing more to support and recognize certified nurses can go a long way toward helping nurses overcome barriers to certification.

The Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation (ONCC) is encouraging employers of all sizes to take a broader view of certification support and is pilot-testing an Employer Discount Program in 2015. Through the program, employers will earn points for the ways in which they encourage, support or recognize certification of oncology nurses. The points will translate into discounts on certification fees. The more an employer does to encourage, support, or recognize certification of oncology nurses, the greater the discount that can be earned.

For example, providing nurses with on-site programs to prepare for certification or certification renewal, offering paid time off to take a test, linking certification to the career ladder, and educating patients on the value of certified nurses are a few of the ways employers can earn points.

Employers must meet minimum levels of support to participate in the program; the discount incentives are intended to encourage and reward them for doing more. For example, employers must agree to pay for certification at the time the candidate applies, rather than as a reimbursement. ONCC Executive Director Cyndi Miller Murphy said that “candidates have told us they’re hesitant to pay the certification fee themselves. The concept of being reimbursed upon passing can make some candidates more anxious about testing. When employers pay for certification in advance, it removes another barrier for the individual nurse.”

Employers who meet specific benchmarks for candidate volume will receive additional discounts. This two-prong approach enables employers of all sizes to participate.

ONCC will pilot test the program in 2015 with a small group of employers of different sizes, according to Murphy. If all goes well, the program will be available to more employers in 2016.

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Exclusive Articles Available Before Print

The Oncology Nursing Forum (ONF) and the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing (CJON) have unveiled advanced print exclusive articles to give our readers access to important, cutting-edge content ahead of print. Articles from the journals are available on the main ONF and CJON pages. These articles are open access, meaning they are available to members and non-members alike, until they appear in print at a later date. At that time, the content will become password-protected like other articles that appear in print as online exclusives in the journals. The latest article to receive the advanced print exclusive designation is “A Systematic Review of Nonpharmacologic Interventions for Treatment-Related Symptoms in Women With Ovarian Cancer” by Lorie L. Davis and Janet S. Carpenter. Check out this timely and informative article today.
 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Check Out the ONS Connect Blog

The official blog of ONS is written by oncology nurses for oncology nurses on a variety of topics of interest, including facing day-to-day challenges at work, juggling busy lives at home, and keeping up to date with the magnitude of information available for practicing nurses.

This month, you’ll find the following new discussions.

As a reader, join in on the conversation and connect with other oncology nurse readers by posting your own stories, tips, ideas, and suggestions in the comments section at the end of each blog post.

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Five-Minute In-Service

The latest Five-Minute In-Service asks, “Is a Neutropenic Diet Necessary for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients?
 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Ask a Team Member

The latest Ask a Team Member column answers the question, “What Do Oncology Nurses Need to Know About Drug Transfusions for Anemia?
 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Photo Credits

“Online Article Review” photo credit: © Corbis. All Rights Reserved.

“Influence Cancer Care Across the Country” photo credit: © Corbis. All Rights Reserved.

“Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation is Pilot-Testing Employer Discount Program” photo credit: Alan Levine

“Check Out the ONS Connect Blog” photo credit: © Corbis. All Rights Reserved.

“Ask a Team Member” photo credit: © Corbis. All Rights Reserved.

 
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Membership Information

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Join a Virtual Community

A great way to stay connected to your SIG is to join its Virtual Community. It’s easy to do so. All you will need to do is

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Subscribe to Your SIG’s Virtual Community Discussion Forum
Once you have your log-in credentials, you are ready to subscribe to your SIG’s Virtual Community discussion forum. To do so,

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Participate in Your SIG’s Virtual Community Discussion Forum

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Sign Up to Receive Your SIG’s Virtual Community Announcements
As an added feature, members also are able to register to receive their SIG’s announcements by e-mail.

  • From your SIG’s Virtual Community page, locate the "Sign Up Here to Receive Your SIG’s Announcements" section.
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Nurse Navigator

Special Interest Group Newsletter  August 2015  
   

Nurse Navigator SIG Officers

SIG Coordinator (2014-2017)
Jean Sellers, RN, MSN
Chapel Hill, NC
Jean_sellers@med.unc.edu  

Editor
Deborah Christensen, RN, BSN, HNB-BC
St. George, UT
deborah.christensen@imail.org

Virtual Community Co-Web Administrator
Ellen Carr, RN, MSN, AOCN®
ecarr@uscd.edu  

Virtual Community Co-Web Administrator
Denise Wiley, RN, BSN, OCN®
dwiley@renown.org

Virtual Community Co-Web Administrator
Paige Woodruff, RN, CBCN®
pwoodruff@harthosp.org

Copy Editor
Samantha Hungerford
Pittsburgh, PA
shungerford@ons.org

 

Quality Outcome Measures (co-leaders)
Tricia Strusowski, MS, RN
tstrusowski@oncologysolutions.com

Karyl Blaset, RN, MSN, OCN®
kblaset@billingsclinic.org

Navigation Resource Toolkit
Julie Aistars, RN, MSN, APN, AOCN®, TTS
jaistars@nch.org

Lay Patient Navigation
Debbie Bickes, RN, MN, OCN®
Debbie.bickes@northside.com

Cancer Care Coordination
Kristen Williamson, MSN, RN, ANP, AOCN®
Kristen.williamson@va.gov

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View past newsletters.

ONS Membership & Component Relations Department Contact Information

Brian K. Theil, CAE, Director of Membership and Component Relations Department
btheil@ons.org
412-859-6244

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dscheuring@ons.org
412-859-6256

Carol DeMarco, Membership Specialist—SIGs
cdemarco@ons.org
412-859-6230

The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) does not assume responsibility for the opinions expressed and information provided by authors or by Special Interest Groups (SIGs). Acceptance of advertising or corporate support does not indicate or imply endorsement of the company or its products by ONS or the SIG. Web sites listed in the SIG newsletters are provided for information only. Hosts are responsible for their own content and availability.

Oncology Nursing Society
125 Enterprise Dr.
Pittsburgh, PA 15275-1214
866-257-4ONS
412-859-6100
www.ons.org

 
 
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