Volume 16, Issue 1, April 2005
The Nurse Practitioner SIG Newsletter is underwritten through a grant from Amgen Inc.
     
Coordinator's Corner
Developing Relationships Helps to Strengthen the SIG


Diane G. Cope, PhD, ARNP, BC, AOCN®
Fort Myers, FL
dgcope@comcast.net

The 2004 SIG Quality Improvement and Needs Assessment Survey results recently were released from ONS. For the Nurse Practitioner (NP) SIG, 739 surveys were sent, with 95 members responding to the survey for a 13% response rate. This response rate was the average response rate for all SIG surveys. Respondents indicated that the top issues for the NP SIG to address for 2005 are NP legislative and reimbursement issues (highlighting the Medicare changes), advanced certification, NP-specific education, mentorship, and communication. Areas that respondents valued most from their SIG membership were access to current, accurate, information about special interest topics (76%); education opportunities (68%); the newsletter (46%); and communicating with colleagues (40%). Areas that needed the most improvement related to SIG membership included communication with SIG members (53%), sharing of resources (47%), and more Web site resources (34%). Finally, many respondents indicated that they would be interested in participating in SIG activities. The highest responses were replying to SIG surveys (59%), participating in a work group within the SIG (39%), submitting topics for Congress and Institutes of Learning (29%), and submitting feedback regarding the SIG's strategic plan (22%).

Based on these results, I again encourage NP SIG members to become involved in SIG activities. Wendy Vogel, MSN, FNP, AOCN®, will assume the role of NP SIG coordinator at the ONS 30th Annual Congress this spring. Wendy is an expert in legislative and reimbursement issues and will be an outstanding leader and resource as the Medicare changes occur and affect our practice over the next two years. To get the most from your membership, participation and involvement is a must!

 
The Nurse Practitioner SIG Newsletter is produced by members of the
Nurse Practitioner SIG and ONS staff and is not a peer-reviewed publication.

Special Interest Group Newsletter  April 2005
 
   

Coordinator's Corner
Developing Relationships Helps to Strengthen the SIG

Diane G. Cope, PhD, ARNP, BC, AOCN®
Fort Myers, FL
dgcope@comcast.net

The 2004 SIG Quality Improvement and Needs Assessment Survey results recently were released from ONS. For the Nurse Practitioner (NP) SIG, 739 surveys were sent, with 95 members responding to the survey for a 13% response rate. This response rate was the average response rate for all SIG surveys. Respondents indicated that the top issues for the NP SIG to address for 2005 are NP legislative and reimbursement issues (highlighting the Medicare changes), advanced certification, NP-specific education, mentorship, and communication. Areas that respondents valued most from their SIG membership were access to current, accurate, information about special interest topics (76%); education opportunities (68%); the newsletter (46%); and communicating with colleagues (40%). Areas that needed the most improvement related to SIG membership included communication with SIG members (53%), sharing of resources (47%), and more Web site resources (34%). Finally, many respondents indicated that they would be interested in participating in SIG activities. The highest responses were replying to SIG surveys (59%), participating in a work group within the SIG (39%), submitting topics for Congress and Institutes of Learning (29%), and submitting feedback regarding the SIG's strategic plan (22%).

Based on these results, I again encourage NP SIG members to become involved in SIG activities. Wendy Vogel, MSN, FNP, AOCN®, will assume the role of NP SIG coordinator at the ONS 30th Annual Congress this spring. Wendy is an expert in legislative and reimbursement issues and will be an outstanding leader and resource as the Medicare changes occur and affect our practice over the next two years. To get the most from your membership, participation and involvement is a must!

Attending the NP SIG meeting at Congress is essential to meet your colleagues, share resources, and network. Unfortunately, with the new Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations, ONS is not permitted to publish a directory of all members' information to the membership. In addition to networking with other colleagues at the NP SIG meeting at Congress, I urge you to contact the coordinator if you have a special request. The coordinator is an individual who has worked with the NP SIG for an extended period of time and has made contact with numerous members over the years. For example, I started my involvement with the NP SIG as newsletter coeditor in 1996. I have met and worked with many NPs across the nation since that time and can refer members to NPs that may have expertise in a specific area. Barbara Biedrzycki, AOCN®, CRNP, in her editor's message in this issue, highlights how involvement and participation can become manageable. We definitely recognize that we all have many responsibilities and we are all stretched too thin. Your NP SIG membership is what you make it. Start by coming to the NP SIG meeting at Congress if you are planning to attend Congress in Orlando, FL, in April. This is an excellent opportunity to meet others and learn about different NP practices. Our SIG has one of the highest memberships, at 814 members as of December 1, 2004. We can be a VERY powerful group if we each have commitment and begin to network.

Lastly, I would like to recognize those individuals who have been my mentors and supporters during my term as coordinator. A special thanks to Kathleen Murphy-Ende, RN, PhD, CFNP, Dawn Camp-Sorrell, RN, MSN, FNP, AOCN®, Rebecca Hawkins, RN, MSN, ANP, AOCN®, Mary Pat Lynch, CRNP, MSN, AOCN®, Terri Armstrong, RN, MS, NP, CS, Janet Van Cleave, MSN, ANP, AOCN®, Christie Hancock, APRN, BC, OCN®, Wendy Smith, RN, MSN, ACNP, AOCN®, Wendy Vogel, MSN, FNP, AOCN®, Bridget Cahill, RN, MS, APN, NPC, Barbara Biedrzycki, AOCN®, CRNP, Debbie Heim, MSN, ARNP, AOCN®, Virginia Rudd, MS, ANP, and the ONS staff members Carol DeMarco and Angie Stengel, BA.

I look forward to seeing everyone at Congress.

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  April 2005
 
   

Demonstration Project Means Extra Reimbursement for Oncology Practices

Wendy H. Vogel, MSN, FNP, AOCN®
Kingsport, TN
wvogel@charter.net

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) are initiating a one-year demonstration project in 2005 to assess and provide new support for the quality of care for patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. This project will focus on three patient conditions: pain, nausea and/or vomiting, and fatigue. Four codes have been created for each category to describe the effects of chemotherapy. Your practice can be paid an extra $130 each time you give chemotherapy in your office if you add these three codes to your claim form, describing your patients' condition at the time of treatment.

The practice will not collect the entire $130 from Medicare, however. The usual Part B coinsurance and deductible will apply. This means that practices will have to collect 20% of this fee ($26) from the patient. A spokesperson for the American Society of Clinical Oncology related to Part B News (reported in December 20, 2004 issue) that even with the additional $26 charge, patients will still be paying smaller copays for chemotherapy treatments in 2005 because of cuts in drug reimbursements. The practice can choose to waive all or a part of the cost-sharing amount for a financially needy beneficiary. The routine waiver of Medicare coinsurance and deductibles, however, may violate the Federal anti-kickback statute if the purpose of the waiver is to generate business payable by a Federal healthcare program.

To participate in this project, you only need to bill these codes with proper documentation. There is no need for special enrollment. These added payments may help offset the decrease in reimbursement for chemotherapy drugs. This project is expected to cost CMS over $300 million. The $130 is a flat, national rate and will not be adjusted for your payment locality. These may be billed by a physician or nurse practitioner operating within the state scope-of-practice laws caring for patients with cancer and administering chemotherapy in an office setting.

Twelve G codes have been created. You must choose and report one G code for pain, one for nausea and/or vomiting, and one for fatigue. The codes will describe a patient's condition on a scale of level 1 (not at all) to level 4 (very much). The levels are based on the Rotterdam Scale for measuring patient reactions to cancer care. You must report one code from each series.

These codes are as follows.

Nausea and/or Vomiting
G9021: chemotherapy assessment for nausea and/or vomiting, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration; assessment level one: not at all
G9022: chemotherapy assessment for nausea and/or vomiting, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration; assessment level two: a little
G9023: chemotherapy assessment for nausea and/or vomiting, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration; assessment level three: quite a bit
G9024: chemotherapy assessment for nausea and/or vomiting, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration; assessment level four: very much

Pain
G9025: chemotherapy assessment for pain, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration, assessment level one: not at all
G9026: chemotherapy assessment for pain, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration, assessment level two: a little
G9027: chemotherapy assessment for pain, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration, assessment level three: quite a bit
G9028: chemotherapy assessment for pain, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration, assessment level four: very much

Fatigue
G9029: chemotherapy assessment for fatigue, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration, assessment level one: not at all
G9030: chemotherapy assessment for fatigue, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration, assessment level two: a little
G9031: chemotherapy assessment for fatigue, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration, assessment level three: quite a bit
G9032: chemotherapy assessment for fatigue, patient reported, performed at the time of chemotherapy administration, assessment level four: very much

CMS will collect data on these assessments to trace improvement in outcomes, such as trends and variations in these measures of patient function as well as reduced hospitalizations or emergency room visits.

Bibliography

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. (2004). Demonstration of improved quality of care for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy [Fact sheet]. Retrieved November 3, 2004, from http://www.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1245

Coughlin, B. (2004). See when you can and can't waive copays, deductibles. Part B News, 18(26), 4–5.

Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General. (2004). Hospital discounts offered to patients who cannot afford to pay their hospital bills. Retrieved March 3, 2005, from http://oig.hhs.gov/fraud/docs/alertsandbulletins/2004/FA021904hospitaldiscounts.pdf

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  April 2005
 
   

Inaugural ONS National Nurse Practitioner Conference:
The Creation and Evaluation

Cathryn Lee, MSN, CRNP, AOCN®
Great Falls, VA
cathryn.lee3@verizon.net

In January 2004, the ONS Steering Council and Board of Directors (BOD) approved and provided funding for an oncology nurse practitioner (NP) conference. The goal of the conference was to meet the continuing educational needs of the NP specializing in oncology care. The conference originally was planned as a stand-alone conference to be held in the fall, but the ONS BOD decided to hold the NP Conference in conjunction with the 2004 Institutes of Learning (IOL) to take advantage of available meeting space, exhibit funding, and other systems in place for the larger IOL conference. IOL tends to attract a higher percentage of staff nurses, whereas Congress is significantly larger and has more advanced practice nurses (APNs) attending. The BOD predicted that holding these conferences together might encourage increased NP participation in IOL, and 112 (nearly one-quarter of NP attendees) took advantage of the NP/IOL crossover.

Upon approval of the project, volunteers for the planning team were solicited from the ONS membership. Much to my surprise, I was invited to serve as team leader, and with some trepidation I accepted the challenge. Five more experienced oncology NPs from a variety of practice settings as well as two members from the ONS National Office completed the team. The conference team members included me, Heather Brumbaugh, RN, MSN, ANP, AOCN®, Sandra Henke, MS, RN, ANP-C, Marjorie Leslie, MSN, CRNP, OCN®, Denise Sartz, MS, FNP-C, AOCN®, Karen Yennie, RN, MSN, FNP, AOCN®, and, from ONS, Laura Fennimore, RN, MSN, director of education, and Kristine LeFebvre, MSN, RN, AOCN®, education associate.

Our first meeting was held at the ONS National Office in Pittsburgh, PA, March 12–14, 2004. We used the results from the 2000 ONS APN survey, and the NP SIG 2002 online survey as well as our own experiences to identify areas of need and interest. By the end of the weekend, we had narrowed the topics, developed a schedule, and begun to identify potential speakers. Although it was a lot of work, it was also a great deal of fun. We started the weekend as relative strangers and ended as a cohesive team. It was very satisfying to create something tangible from a relatively blank slate.

During the summer, we busily contacted and confirmed speakers. The turnaround time was very short because outlines and key slides were due by August 23 and final slides by mid-October. In addition to our duties as team members, we each had our own presentations to prepare as well. We communicated primarily via countless e-mails. Kris LeFebvre expertly coordinated all of this activity, kept us on track and provided moral support as needed.

On November 4, less than nine months after our first meeting, the conference opened in Nashville, TN, with an upbeat and entertaining presentation by NP and humorist, Kevin Lee Smith, RN, CNP, MSN. Over the next two days of the conference, many topics were covered; although we knew that including everything or pleasing everyone was not possible, we believed that we had chosen a wide enough variety of sessions to meet the educational needs of most attendees. Topics covered included

  • Plenary sessions on advances in radiology, advocacy and health policy, and new medications
  • Breakout sessions on common comorbidities (hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], and depression)
  • Diagnostic and assessment breakout sessions (radiology, laboratory assessment of leukemia, dermatology, and geriatrics)
  • Disease updates for lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, and lymphoma
  • Roundtable discussions on a variety of topics including transplant, survivorship, the NP role, reimbursement, and complementary and alternative medicine
  • An informal poster session.

The most well-attended sessions were the plenary sessions, the keynote, and the sessions on advocacy, radiology, and lymphoma. Most breakout sessions were well received; the highest rated included those on COPD, depression, dermatology, and lung cancer. The conference proceeded on schedule with relatively few problems, although some of the team members did sprout gray hair and develop chest pain when one of the speakers did not show up. Unbeknownst to any of us, his flight had been delayed, then cancelled, and he was stuck at an airport somewhere. Fortunately, being ever-resourceful nurses, Heather Brumbaugh volunteered to stand in and give her presentation a few hours earlier than anticipated, and efforts were made to find a replacement speaker.

Despite the glitches, the conference was well received overall. I was thrilled during my opening remarks to hear the crowd cheer at being provided with a conference designed specifically for oncology NPs. The comments provided on the evaluations were very thoughtful and included fantastic suggestions and ideas, many of which will be incorporated in future conferences. One suggestion already acted upon by the board is to hold the conference annually, instead of biannually as originally planned. Many opportunities for future involvement will be available. Although the deadline for project team members for the planning team for the second annual National NP Conference to be held in Phoenix, AZ, has passed, consider volunteering for other ways to become involved in the conference and respond to the calls for this or other ONS projects. My experience as team leader for the planning team was exhausting yet exhilarating. After many years of wishing for a national conference for oncology NPs, the opportunity to be a part of its creation was a dream come true.

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  April 2005
 
   

Editor's Message
Nurses Can Make Patients Feel Special in Many Ways

Barbara Biedrzycki, AOCN®, CRNP
Abingdon, MD
npbiedrzycki@aol.com

Giving someone a simple sticker stating, "Patients are special people" may prompt a smile, a warm and fuzzy feeling, a stronger healthcare relationship bond, or all three simultaneously. Although the sticker giveaways may be more prevalent in the pediatric population, even seniors may appreciate the outward sign of our feelings for them. However, most of us let our patients know that they are special in more subtle ways. A hug or a big smile will let them feel that special message too.

Although the special relationships that exist between nurse practitioners (NPs) and patients may not be as easy for the world to see as the bright stickers, the inner feelings generated through our oncology care relationships are just as real. These oncology relationships allow nurse practitioners and patients to feel and be special. We care, and they know it. They care, and we know it.

This relationship did not develop magically. It is based within our rich nursing history of caring, rewarded by repeated surveys indicating that we are in the most trusted profession, and strengthened by our advanced oncology nursing practice that allows us to give patients the care they need. Although each of us is responsible for initiating and maintaining this relationship, it may be so natural that we don't have to consciously think about how we can incorporate it into our practice. Without a second thought, we award our patients with the invisible, "Patients are special people!" sticker at every visit.

Perhaps patients and NPs bond, and mutual sense of appreciation can be the basis to reflect on the relationship you have with the NP SIG. Of course, the structural relationship between the groups are vastly different because in the later the nurse practitioners are the NP SIG, but the concepts of collaboration, commitment, and appreciation may be similar.

Relationships take time to build. This year, the NP SIG will celebrate its 15th anniversary, and now is a great time for you to help us strengthen the relationships NP SIG members have. Having about 7% of the entire SIG membership, the NP SIG is the fourth largest SIG with more than members. We can accomplish so much with these numbers.

Consider becoming more involved with the NP SIG; your commitment can be as small or as huge as you want. Our coordinator, Diane Cope, PhD, APRN-BC, AOCN®, will work with you to find something that will meet your interests and availability. Some may want to use the NP SIG as an opportunity to learn new skills or to network more intensely with other oncology NPs.

We have an innovative plan to share the responsibility for the NP SIG Newsletter. I am one of three coeditors. I think I can safely speak for my two editorial colleagues when I say that none of us wanted the responsibility of the newsletter by ourselves, yet we all wanted to help somehow. Instead of three NP SIG members saying, "No, I don't have the time," three said "yes, but . . ." So the plan was for each of us to be responsible for one of the three issues. The workload suddenly became manageable, and we all are able to contribute to the SIG.

This is just one example of how traditional volunteer opportunities can be modified to meet individual NP SIG members' needs. Another opportunity would be to write a short article for the newsletter. If you are not sure if your article idea would be of interest to the NP SIG members, just ask. We can help you develop your idea, and the citation will look wonderful on your curriculum vitae. It would be great if you would send the coeditors your thoughts about what you'd like to see in the newsletter. (See the SIG Officers page for our e-mail addresses.) This newsletter is our major communication tool. Help us to make it what you need it to be.

I wish that I could give everyone of you today a bright sticker that says, "NP SIG members are special people!" Remember that we are called a "Special" Interest Group for a reason. Without you we have no purpose, but with your help we can accomplish great things.

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  April 2005
 
   

Will the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Soon Become Our Next Credential?

Barbara Biedrzycki, AOCN®, CRNP
Abingdon, MD
npbiedrzycki@aol.com

What do you think about a doctorate in nursing becoming the entry-level educational requirement for nurse practitioners (NPs)? If you haven't formed an opinion yet, consider reviewing the Summary of Recommendations from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Position Statement on the Practice Doctorate in Nursing (2004) written by an 11-member task force charged with the responsibility to explore the current status of nursing doctoral programs, compare models, and make recommendations.

Summary of Recommendations

    The task force recommends that
  1. The term practice doctorate be used instead of clinical doctorate.
  2. The practice-focused doctoral program be a distinct model of doctoral education that provides an additional option for attaining a terminal degree in the discipline.
  3. Practice-focused doctoral programs prepare graduates for the highest level of nursing practice beyond the initial preparation in the discipline.
  4. Practice-focused doctoral programs include seven essential areas of content.
  5. Practice doctoral programs include development and/or validation of expertise in one area of specialized advanced nursing practice.
  6. Practice-focused doctoral nursing programs prepare leaders for nursing practice.
  7. One-degree title be chosen to represent practice-focused doctoral programs that prepare graduates for the highest level of nursing practice.
  8. The doctor of nursing practice (DNP) be the degree associated with practice-focused doctoral nursing education.
  9. The doctoral of nursing (ND) degree title be phased out.
  10. The practice doctorate be the graduate degree for advanced nursing practice preparation, including, but not limited to, the four current advanced practice nurse roles: clinical nurse specialist, nurse anesthetist, nurse midwife, and nurse practitioner.
  11. A transition period be planned to provide nurses with master's degrees, who wish to obtain a practice doctoral degree, a mechanism to earn a practice doctorate in a relatively streamlined fashion with credit given for previous graduate study and practice experience.
  12. Practice doctorate programs, as in research-focused doctoral programs, are encouraged to offer additional coursework and practica that would prepare graduates to fill the role of nurse educator.
  13. Practice-focused doctoral programs needs to be accredited by a nursing accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education.

Note. From AACN Position Statement in the Practice Doctorate in Nursing, October 2004, pp. 14–15.

You may be interested in reading the entire position statement about the practice doctorate at www.aacn.nche.edu/DNP/pdf/DNP.pdf.

As of in January 2005, the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation (ONCC) is offering a certification examination specifically for oncology nurse practitioners with an educational requirement of a master's or higher in nursing from an accredited institution and successful completion of an accredited nurse practitioner program. ONCC will award the title Advanced Oncology Certified Nurse Practitioner (AOCNP) to successful candidates.

The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) has the same educational requirements as ONCC for a nurse to be considered a candidate for certification as a nurse practitioner. Each organization also requires active nurse licensure and 500 hours of supervised clinical practice in the specialty area.

Although the AACN already has recommended that the preparation level for NPs become the doctoral level by 2015, the ANCC has not yet had any discussion about changing their educational requirements to be eligible to take the NP examination. Your opinion about the educational entry level likely will be important to our chosen profession in the very near future.

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  April 2005
 
   

Check Out the Redesigned Evidence-Based Practice Resource Area

Use the Evidence-Based Practice Resource Area as your guide to identify, critically appraise, and utilize evidence to solve clinical problems. Be sure to check out the new format, which allows for much easier use and navigation. This information can be found at http://onsopcontent.ons.org/toolkits/evidence/index.shtml

 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  April 2005
 
   

Membership Information

SIG Membership Benefits

  • Network with colleagues in an identified subspecialty area around the country.
  • Contribute articles for your SIG’s newsletter.
  • Participate in discussions with other SIG members.
  • Contribute to the future path of the SIG.
  • Share your expertise.
  • Support and/or mentor a colleague.
  • Receive information about the latest advancements in treatments, clinical trials, etc.
  • Participate in ONS leadership by running for SIG coordinator-elect or join SIG work groups.
  • Acquire information with a click of a mouse at http://sig.ons.wego.net/index.v3page;jsessionid=l5nhe8e4qt77?v2_group=0&p=4918, including
    • Educational opportunities for your subspecialty
    • Education material on practice
    • Calls to action
    • News impacting or affecting your specific SIG
    • Newsletters
    • Communiqués
    • Meeting minutes.
Join a Virtual Community

A great way to stay connected to your SIG is to join its Virtual Community. It’s easy to do so. All you will need to do is
  • Log on to the ONS Web site (http://www.ons.org/).
  • Select “Membership” from the tabs above.
  • Then, click on “ONS Chapters and Special Interest Groups.”
  • Scroll down to “Visit the ONS Special Interest Groups (SIG) Virtual Community” and click.
  • Now, select “Find a SIG.”
  • Locate and click on the name of your SIG from the list of all ONS SIGs displayed.
  • Once the front page of your SIG's Virtual Community appears on screen, select “New User” from the top left. (This allows you to create log-in credentials.)
  • Type the required information into the text fields as prompted.
  • Click “Join Group” (at the bottom right of the text fields) when done.

    Special Notices
    • If you already have log-in credentials generated from the ONS Web site, use this information instead of attempting to generate new information.
    • If you created log-in credentials for the ONS Web site and wish to have different log-in information, you will not be able to use the same e-mail address to generate your new credentials. Instead, use an alternate e-mail address.
Subscribe to Your SIG’s Virtual Community Discussion Forum

All members are encouraged to participate in their SIG’s discussion forum. This area affords the opportunity for exchange of information between members and nonmembers on topics specific to all oncology subspecialties. Once you have your log-in credentials, you are ready to subscribe to your SIG’s Virtual Community discussion forum. To do so,
  • Select “Log In,” located next to “New User,” and enter your information.
  • Next, click on the “Discussion” tab on the top right of the title bar.
  • Now, select “Featured Discussion” from the left drop-down menu.
  • Locate and select “Subscribe to Discussion” inside the “Featured Discussion” section.
  • Go to “Subscription Options” and select “Options.”
  • When you have selected and entered all required criteria, you will receive a confirmation message.
  • Click “Finish.”
  • You are now ready to begin participating in your SIG’s discussion forum.
Participate in Your SIG’s Virtual Community Discussion Forum
  • First, log in. (This allows others to identify you and enables you to receive notification [via e-mail] each time a response or new topic is posted.)
  • Click on “Discussion” from the top title bar.
  • Select “Featured Discussion” from the left drop-down menu.
  • Click on any posted topic to view contents and post responses.
Sign Up to Receive Your SIG’s Virtual Community Announcements

As an added feature, members also are able to register to receive their SIG’s announcements by e-mail.
  • From your SIG’s Virtual Community page, locate the “Sign Up Here to Receive Your SIG’s Announcements” section. This appears above the posted announcements section.
  • Select the “Click Here” feature, which will take you to a link to subscribe.
  • Once the “For Announcement Subscription Only” page appears on screen, select how you wish to receive your announcements.
    • As individual e-mails each time a new announcement is posted
    • One e-mail per day comprised of all new daily announcements posted
    • Opt-out, indicating that you will frequently browse your SIG’s Virtual Community page for new postings
  • Enter your e-mail address.
  • Click on “Next Page.”
  • Because you have already joined your SIG’s Virtual Community, you will receive a security prompt with your registered user name already listed. Enter your password at this prompt and click “Finish.”
  • This will bring up a listing of your SIG’s posted announcements. Click on “My SIG’s Page” to view all postings in their entirety or to conclude the registration process and begin browsing.
 
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Special Interest Group Newsletter  April 2005
 
   

Nurse Practitioner SIG Officers

Coordinator (2003-2005)
Diane Cope, PhD, ARNP-BC, AOCN®
605 Astarias Circle
Fort Myers, FL 33919-3247
239-437-3571 (H)
239-437-4444 (O)
dgcope@comcast.net

Coordinator-Elect (2004-2005)
Wendy Vogel, RN, MSN, FNP, AOCN®
405 Pettyjohn Rd.
Kingsport, TN 37664-4716
423-323-0715 (H)
423-968-2311 (O)
wvogel@charter.net

Web Site Administrator
Bridget A. Cahill, RN, MS, APN, NPC
5145 N. Meade Ave.
Chicago, IL 60630-1826
773-775-9575 (H)
312-695-0316 (O)
312-695-6189 (Fax)
bcahill@nmff.org

Coeditor
Barbara Biedrzycki, RN, MSN, AOCN®
709 W. Baker Ave.
Abingdon, MD 21009-1457
410-538-7946 (H)
410-614-6894 (O)
NPBiedrzycki@aol.com

 

Coeditor
Deborah Heim, RN, MSN, ARNP, AOCN®
5150 Harborage Dr.
Fort Myers, FL 33908-4542
239-466-4990 (H)
239-275-6400 (O)
heimcats@yahoo.com

Coeditor
Virginia Rudd, RN, MS, NP-C, AOCN®
166 W. 75th St., Apt. 216
New York, NY 10023-1900
212-595-6879 (H)
212-263-7411 b2436 (O)
vrudd@rcn.com

ONS Publishing Division Staff
Elisa Becze, BA
Copy Editor
412-859-6317
ebeceze@ons.org

Know someone who would like to receive a print copy of this newsletter?
To print a copy of this newsletter from your home or office computer, click here or on the printer icon located on the SIG Newsletter front page. Print copies of each online SIG newsletter also are available through the ONS National Office. To have a copy mailed to you or another SIG member, contact Membership/Leadership Administrative Assistant Carol DeMarco at cdemarco@ons.org or 866-257-4ONS, ext. 6230.

To view past newsletters click here.

ONS Membership/Leadership Team Contact Information

Angie Stengel, Director of Membership/Leadership
astengel@ons.org
412-859-6244

Diane Scheuring, Manager of Member Services
dscheuring@ons.org
412-859-6256

Carol DeMarco, Membership/Leadership Administrative Assistant
cdemarco@ons.org
412-859-6230

The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) does not assume responsibility for the opinions expressed and information provided by authors or by Special Interest Groups (SIGs). Acceptance of advertising or corporate support does not indicate or imply endorsement of the company or its products by ONS or the SIG. Web sites listed in the SIG newsletters are provided for information only. Hosts are responsible for their own content and availability.

Oncology Nursing Society
125 Enterprise Dr.
Pittsburgh, PA 15275-1214
866-257-4ONS
412-859-6100
www.ons.org

 
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